Carp Flies

by Adam January 22, 2013

 

Out of pure respect, all my flies are barbless…

 

 

“Carp Damsels”

(#10 TMC 5263)

 

This fly is my go-to pattern. Over the years it has proved to be my top producer. Everyone has their “confidence fly”, and this is mine. It’s a weightless rendition of a damsel or dragon fly nymph. I’m able to target feeding, cruising, and laid up fish with this pattern, making it very versatile. I fish this fly to mudders’ and cruisers by leading the fish at an estimated distance so that the fly has time to slowly parachute down in the water column directly into their line of vision. I fish the fly with no additional action what so ever. I just allow the fly to free fall to the bottom. This fly is best fished with a loop knot to insure it falls unrestricted and perfectly horizontal in the water column. If their interested and willing, they’ll meander over and grab it…if not they’ll ignore it. If ignored, the fly is non-intrusive so the fish will usually not be alarmed by its presence, allowing another cast to be made. Also, if ignored don’t think they haven’t seen it, they have excellent vision. As for laid up fish, I fish this fly with an 18+ foot leader insuring that my fly line lands nowhere near the fish. I will over shoot my target, but never directly over top of it, always at an angle to one side or another. Once the fly lands I will SLOWLY strip the fly into the fishes line of sight, never directly up to the fish itself, remember, they have excellent vision. I will bring the fly within three or four feet of the fish at eye level and then let the fly free fall. Like I said before, if their interested they’ll come and get it. If not try again. If you bring the fly up on the fish too close or too fast you’ll never get a second chance. Laid up fish are my favorite because there is so much room for human error. Challenge Accepted.

 

 

Assorted Damsels

(#10 TMC 5263)

 

 

 

“Hover Damsel”

(#10 TMC 5263)

 

This pattern is just a modified damsel. Instead of scud back I tie it with craft foam. If I’m in a situation where the majority of fish I’m targeting are laid up, I will use this fly. The foam back modification allows the fly to free fall slower than my original damsel, giving the laid up fish more time to make a decision.

 

 

“Articulated Damsel”

(#10 TMC 2457)

 

The articulated damsel is another spin off my original. I’m always looking for a slightly new profile to show the fish because the small populations of carp I fish for become conditioned to a certain pattern after awhile. All it takes is something a bit different to rekindle their interest.

 

 

 

Articulation does the trick

 

 

“Carp Dragons”

(#8 Daiichi 2451)

Unlike my damsel pattern that I created to resemble either a damsel or a dragon fly nymph. My dragon pattern is a more species specific rendition of a dragon fly nymph. Like I said before, fish populations will become conditioned to a certain pattern overtime. This one really saved me in the latter part of 2012. This pattern is also weightless and fished in the same manner as the damsel. It free falls slightly angled, nose down. Exactly like a fleeing dragonfly nymph trying to reach the safety of the benthos. A perfect target for a prowling carp.

 

 

Dragon

(#4 Owner Mosquito)

 

 

One can’t resist a fleeing dragon

 

 

Damsel

(#8 TMC 7999)

 

 Damsel

(#10 TMC 2457)

 

This open water cruiser fell victim to a damsel presented mid-column

 

 

Damsel Variant

(#10 Gamakatsu SL45)

 

Various Crayfish Patterns

(#4 Gamakatsu SC15)

 

 

 

(#6 TMC 2457)

 

 

“Temptation”

(#10 TMC 105)

 

This concoction is a unique attractor pattern I whipped up while bored one night. As crazy and outlandish as it looks, it actually works. I fish this fly as I would the damsel, leading the fish and letting it slowly sink. If they don’t see it, there is a good chance their blind, haha!

 

 

 

“Quick-Sight Jumbo Spawn”

(#4 Gamakatsu SL45)

 

This pattern I use on occasion when I have to present a fly at an insane distance. It’s a simple sucker spawn with an opaque bead secured in the center. The pattern is large, bright, and sometimes terrifying. The bead acts like a parachute post on a dry fly, giving it excellent visibility. Making it easy to see when the fish eats. This pattern will only work a few times on a specific body of water before each and every fish knows whats up.

 

 








Also in Blog

3rd Annual Skinny Water Culture Paddle Craft Tournament

by Shane Alexander April 11, 2017

3rd Annual Paddle Craft Tournament

by Vince Stegura February 17, 2017

Surf Expo 2017

by Jenn Stegura January 29, 2017